A Fool Who’ll

A Fool Who’ll

Studio album by Laura Jean

Released
2011

Genre
Folk

Length
44:48

Label
Chapter Music

Producer
Simon Grounds

Laura Jean chronology

Eden Land
(2008)
A Fool Who’ll
(2011)
Laura Jean
2014

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating

Sydney Morning Herald
[1]

The Age
[2]

A Fool Who’ll is the third album by Melbourne folk singer-songwriter Laura Jean. It was released in September 2011.

Contents

1 Track listing
2 Personnel

2.1 Additional personnel

3 References

Track listing[edit]
(All songs by Laura Jean)

“So Happy” – 3:32
“Missing You” – 4:54
“Valenteen” – 4:06
“Noël” – 5:30
“Spring” – 6:13
“Marry Me” – 5:34
“Australia” – 5:36
“My Song” – 4:00
“All Along” – 4:52

Personnel[edit]

Laura Jean Englert — vocals, electric and acoustic guitars, saxophone, bass
Biddy Connor — viola, piano accordion, Casio SK1, vocals, string arrangements (“Spring”, “My Song”)
Jen Sholakis — drums, electric and acoustic guitars, vocals

Additional personnel[edit]

Martin Mackerras — clarinet (“Valenteen”, “Marry Me”)
Andrea Sumner — violin (“Noël”, “All Along”)
Paddy Mann — vocals (“Spring”)
Zoe Barry — cello (“Spring”, “Marry Me”, “My Song”)
Steph O’Hara — violin (“Spring”, “Marry Me”, “My Song”)
Jojo Petrina — vocals (“My Song”)
Monica Sonand — vocals (“My Song”)
Isobel Knowles — trumpet (“Australia”)

References[edit]

^ Bernard Zuel, The Sydney Morning Herald, 10 September 2011.
^ Michael Dwyer, The Age, 23 September 2011.

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Neckarsulmer SU

Neckarsulmer SU

Full name
Neckarsulmer Sport-Union e.V.

Founded
2009

Ground
Pichterichstadion

Chairman
Klaus Dieter zur Linden

Head Coach
Thorsten Damm

League
Oberliga Baden-Württemberg (V)

2015–16
Verbandsliga Württemberg (VI), 1st (promoted)

Neckarsulmer SU is a German association football club from the town of Neckarsulm, Baden-Württemberg. The club’s greatest success has been promotion to the tier five Oberliga Baden-Württemberg in 2016 and participation in the first round of the 2013–14 DFB-Pokal.
The club also has, among many others, a rugby union department, with the team playing in the 2. Rugby-Bundesliga since 2012.

Contents

1 History
2 Honours
3 Recent seasons
4 References
5 External links

History[edit]
The origins of the club date back to 1908 when two football clubs were formed in Neckarsulm, Phoenix 08 and 1. FC Neckarsulm. Two years later the two clubs merged to form Sportverein Neckarsulm.[1]
After years of playing in the lower amateur leagues of Württemberg the club won promotion to the tier three Amateurliga Württemberg in 1958. In 1960 this league was split into two regional divisions and Neckarsulm became part of the new Amateurliga Nordwürttemberg. It was relegated from this level again in 1961 but returned the following season. After three seasons as a lower table side the club was relegated again in 1965.[2] Before that, in 1964, it won the Württemberg Cup for the first time, something the club repeated in 1969.[1]
In the following decades Neckarsulm returned to the lower amateur leagues, fluctuating between the Kreisliga, Bezirksliga and Landesliga.[1] On 1 January 2009 Sportvereinigung Neckarsulm merged with Sportfreunde Neckarsulm to form the Neckarsulmer Sport-Union.[3] In 2013, after a Landesliga title, the new club won promotion to the Verbandsliga Württemberg for the first time.[4]
The club qualified for the first round of the 2013–14 DFB-Pokal, the German Cup, as the runners-up of the Württemberg Cup, taking up Dynamo Dresden’s spot after the latter had been banned from the competition. Neckarsulm lost 7–0 to 1. FC Kaiserslautern in the first round and was knocked out.[5]
After three Verbandsliga seasons from 2013 to 2016 the club won the league in 2015–16 and won promotion to the tier five Oberliga Baden-Württemberg for the first time.[4]
Honours[edit]
The club’s honours:

Verbandsliga Württemberg

Champions: 2015–16

Landesliga Württemberg I

Champions: 2012–13

Bezirks
강남오피

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Meir ibn Aldabi

Meir ibn Aldabi (Hebrew: מאיר אבן אלדבי) was a writer of the 14th century, son of Isaac Aldabi, “He-Ḥasid” (The Pious), grandson of Asher ben Jehiel, and a descendant of the exiles from Jerusalem. His name (erroneously spelled Albadi, Albalidi, Alrabi, and Altabi) is ascertained from his chief work, Shebile Emunah, wherein a poem is found in which every line begins with a letter of his name, and there it reads “Aldabi.”

Contents

1 Biography
2 Shebile Emunah
3 Jewish Encyclopedia bibliography
4 References

Biography[edit]
In the preface to his book occurs the expression, “of the exiles of Jerusalem.” This, together with Aldabi’s statement that he was exiled from his country (Andalusia), caused Graetz to assume that Meir ibn Aldabi was banished to Jerusalem. Graetz failed to take into account Aldabi’s words, “He [God] led me into a waste land,” which he would not have used in reference to Jerusalem.
Aldabi belonged to the class of popular writers who, possessing extensive theological and scientific knowledge, commented upon the assertions of their predecessors with a clear understanding, expressing here and there their own opinions, and presenting some subjects from the standpoint of the Kabbala. Aldabi was also one of those Talmudists whose conception of religion was wholly spiritual and who revered the Cabala: he can not, however, be called a true cabalist. In 1360 he wrote Shebile Emunah (The Paths of Faith), an exhaustive treatise on philosophical, scientific, and theological subjects. To judge from the many editions that appeared from time to time, it was for centuries a favorite book with the educated.
Shebile Emunah[edit]
Shebile Emunah (Shevilei Emunah) is divided into ten chapters, which treat respectively of:

The existence of God, His attributes, His immateriality, unity, and immutability, which is not affected by prayer or even by miracles – introducing in each case a cabalistic discussion of the names of the Deity.
The creation of the world, which does not necessitate any change in God or any plurality in His nature; an explanation of the Biblical account being given, followed by a dissertation on the seven climates or zones of the earth as then conceived, the spheres, the stars, the sun and moon and their eclipses, and on meteorology.
Human embryology and the generative functions.
Human anatomy, physiology, and pathology.
Rules for health and long life.
The soul and its functions.
The exaltation of the soul, which, throug

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59th Ohio Infantry

59th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Active
September 12, 1861 to July 16, 1865

Country
United States

Allegiance
Union

Branch
Infantry

Engagements
Battle of Shiloh
Siege of Corinth
Battle of Perryville
Battle of Stones River
Tullahoma Campaign
Battle of Chickamauga
Siege of Chattanooga
Battle of Missionary Ridge
Atlanta Campaign
Battle of Resaca
Battle of Kennesaw Mountain
Siege of Atlanta
Battle of Jonesboro

The 59th Ohio Volunteer Infantry (or 59th OVI) was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Contents

1 Service
2 Detailed service
3 Casualties
4 Commanders
5 See also
6 References
7 External links

Service[edit]
The 59th Ohio Infantry was organized at Ripley, Ohio and mustered in for three years service on September 12, 1861 under the command of Colonel James P. Fyffe. The regiment was recruited in Brown and Clermont counties.
The regiment was attached to 11th Brigade, Army of the Ohio, to December 1861. 11th Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Ohio, to March 1862. 11th Brigade, 5th Division, Army of the Ohio, to September 1862. 11th Brigade, 5th Division, II Corps, Army of the Ohio, to November 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, Left Wing, XIV Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, XXI Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to October 1863. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, IV Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to September 1864. Unattached, 4th Division, XX Corps, Department of the Cumberland, to October 1864. Tullahoma, Tennessee, Defenses of Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, Department of the Cumberland, to October 1864.
The majority of 59th Ohio Infantry mustered out of service on October 31, 1864. Recruits and non-veterans were kept in the service as Companies I and K, 59th Ohio Infantry and mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee on June 28 and July 16, 1865.
Detailed service[edit]
Moved to Maysville, Ky., October 1. Nelson’s Campaign in Kentucky October-November. Action at West Liberty October 21. Olympian Springs November 4. Ivy Mountain November 8. Piketon November 8–9. Moved to Louisa, thence to Louisville and to Columbia, Ky., December 11. Duty at Columbia, Ky., December 11, 1861 to February 15, 1862. March to Bowling Green, Ky., thence to Nashville, Tenn., February 15-March 8. March to Savannah, Tenn.; March 18-April 6. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6–7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Occupation of Corinth May 30, and pursuit to Booneville Ma

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Froebel College of Education

Froebel College of Education

Coláiste Oideachais Froebel

Type
Public

Established
1943 – 2013

President
Marie McLoughlin

Students
250

Location
Dublin, Ireland

Campus
Suburban

Nickname
Froebel

Affiliations
CERC, University of Dublin, National University of Ireland, Maynooth

Website
www.froebel.ie

Froebel College of Education was one of five colleges in Ireland which is recognized by the Department of Education and Skills for the training and education of national school teachers. It was located at Sion Hill, Cross Avenue, Blackrock, Dublin and is run by the Dominican Order.
Froebel College, along with Coláiste Mhuire of Marino and the Church of Ireland College of Education Rathmines had been associated with Trinity College, Dublin, which both awarded the degree of Bachelor in Education (B.Ed.) and the Higher Diploma in Education (Primary Teaching). The College also ran a BA degree in Early Childhood – Teaching and Learning (NUIM) and a one-year Post-Graduate Diploma in Special Education (NUIM). From September 2010, incoming students of Froebel College were being accredited by National University of Ireland, Maynooth (NUIM).

Contents

1 History

1.1 Name

2 Move to NUI Maynooth
3 References
4 External links

History[edit]

Freidrich Froebel, who laid the foundation for modern education based on the recognition that children have unique needs and capabilities. He created the concept of the “kindergarten” and also coined the word now used in German and English. He also developed the educational toys known as Froebel Gifts.

The college was established in 1943 by the Congregation of Dominican Sisters Sion Hill, who also ran the St Catherine’s College of Education for Home Economics from 1929 to 2007, in Sion Hill, Blackrock. The 1970s saw the college’s qualifications attain B.Ed. status, when Froebel had its degrees accredited by the University of Dublin. In 2008 a refurbishment of the buildings in Blackrock was completed. In April 2010 plans for Froebel College to move to NUI Maynooth were announced.[1] In October 2016 Froebel College moved to a new permanent home, a purpose built facility on the Maynooth University campus.
Froebel Education is associated with progressive child-centred education. It seeks to foster quality teaching and learning, creativity, integration and sound practical classroom management in whatever situations teachers work with children.
Name[edit]
Froebel College of Education took its name from the 1
춘자넷

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Joakim Eriksson

Joakim Eriksson

Born
(1976-06-22) June 22, 1976 (age 40)
Södertälje, SWE

Height
5 ft 11 in (180 cm)

Weight
182 lb (83 kg; 13 st 0 lb)

Position
Centre

Shot
Left

Played for
SHL
 Djurgårdens IF
 Linköpings HC
 Södertälje SK
SM-liiga
 Espoo Blues

Playing career
1996–2015

Joakim Eriksson (born June 22, 1976) is a retired Swedish professional ice hockey player and current general manager of the Djurgårdens IF of the Swedish Hockey League.[1] He has previously played for SHL teams Djurgårdens IF, Linköpings HC and Södertälje SK. Eriksson also played in Finland for Espoo Blues in the SM-liiga.
External links[edit]

Joakim Eriksson profile at Eurohockey.com
Joakim Eriksson’s career statistics at The Internet Hockey Database
Eriksson retires

References[edit]

^ Mattsson, Sebastian (9 April 2015). “Djurgården värvar: Fyra spelare klara”. Expressen. Retrieved 9 April 2015. 

This biographical article relating to a Swedish ice hockey centre is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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2980 Cameron

2980 Cameron

Discovery [1]

Discovered by
S. J. Bus

Discovery site
Siding Spring Obs.

Discovery date
2 March 1981

Designations

MPC designation
2980 Cameron

Named after

Alastair Cameron[2]

Alternative names

1981 EU17 · 1977 EL3
1979 SQ7

Minor planet category

main-belt

Orbital characteristics [1]

Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)

Uncertainty parameter 0

Observation arc
14091 days (38.58 yr)

Aphelion
3.0334 AU (453.79 Gm)

Perihelion
2.1018 AU (314.42 Gm)

Semi-major axis

2.5676 AU (384.11 Gm)

Eccentricity
0.18142

Orbital period

4.11 yr (1502.8 d)

Mean anomaly

252.45°

Mean motion

0° 14m 22.38s / day

Inclination
7.2772°

Longitude of ascending node

172.25°

Argument of perihelion

254.30°

Earth MOID
1.12812 AU (168.764 Gm)

Jupiter MOID
2.32697 AU (348.110 Gm)

Jupiter Tisserand parameter
3.397

Physical characteristics

Absolute magnitude (H)

13.4

2980 Cameron, provisionally designated 1981 EU17, is a main-belt asteroid discovered by prolific American astronomer Schelte Bus at Siding Spring Observatory, Australia, on March 2, 1981. It orbits the Sun every 4.11 years at a distance of 2.1–3.0 AU.[1]
The asteroid was named after astrophysicist and cosmogonist Alastair G. W. Cameron (1925–2005), who was associate director for theoretical astrophysics at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He was an early advocate of the concepts of a turbulent accretion disk solar nebula, and of the origin of the Moon by a giant impact on the proto-Earth. He also studied the nucleosynthesis in stars and supernovae, and the cosmic abundances of nuclides.[2]
References[edit]

^ a b c “JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2980 Cameron (1981 EU17)” (2015-07-19 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2980) Cameron. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 245. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 

External links[edit]

Dictionary of Minor Planet Names, Google books
2980 Cameron at the JPL Small-Body Database

Discovery · Orbit diagram · Orbital elements · Physical parameters

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Minor planets navigator

2979 Murmansk
2980 Cameron
2981 Chagall

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Inuvialuit

“Inuvialuk” redirects here. For their language, see Inuvialuktun.

Person
Inuvialuk

People
Inuvialuit

Language
Inuvialuktun

Aklavik

Inuvik

Paulatuk

Sachs Harbour

Tuktoyaktuk

Ulukhaktok

Inuvialuit communities in the Northwest Territories

Indigenous peoples
in Canada

First Nations
Inuit
Métis

History

Paleo-Indians
Pre-colonization
Genetics
Residential schools
Indian hospitals
Conflicts
First Nations
Inuit

Politics

Crown and Indigenous peoples
Treaty rights
Health Policy
Numbered Treaties
Royal Commission
Self-government
Indian Act
British Columbia Treaty Process
Idle No More
Lateral violence
Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women
Politics
Organizations
Case law

Indigenous and Northern
Affairs Canada

Culture

Indigenous cultures
Indigenous personalities
Country food
Music

Demographics

Indian reserves
AB

FN
Métis

Atlantic CA
BC
MB
ON
QC
SK
Territories
Pacific Coast

Linguistics

Indigenous languages
Inuit languages
Indigenous English Dialects
NAPA
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Inuit grammar

Religions

Traditional beliefs

Inuit mythology

Index

Index of articles
Indigenous
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Wikiprojects
Portal

Aboriginal Canadian portal

WikiProject

Indigenous North Americans

First Nations

Commons
Wiktionary

Inuit

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Commons
Wiktionary

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The Inuvialuit (ɪnˈuviˌaluət) (sing. Inuvialuk; the real people[1]) or Western Canadian Inuit are Inuit people who live in the western Canadian Arctic region. They, like all other Inuit, are descendants of the Thule who migrated eastward from Alaska.[2] Their homeland – the Inuvialuit Settlement Region – covers the Arctic Ocean coastline area from the Alaskan border, east through the Beaufort Sea and beyond the Amundsen Gulf which includes some of the western Canadian Arctic Islands, as well as the inland community of Aklavik and part of the Yukon.[3][4] The land was demarked in 1984 by the Inuvialuit Final Agreement.

Contents

1 History and migration
2 Language
3 Culture
4 Communities
5 References
6 External links

History and migration[edit]
Before the 20th century. the Inuvialuit Settlement Region was primarily inhabited by Siglit Inuit, but in the second half of the 19th century, their numbers were decimated by the introduction of new diseases. Nunatamiut, Alaskan Inuit, moved into traditional Siglit areas in the 1910s and 20s, enticed in p
연예인야동

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John Chaplin (disambiguation)

John Chaplin is a former American track and field athlete and coach.
John Chaplin may also refer to:

Jack Chaplin (1882-1951), Scottish association football coach
Sir John Chaplin (died 1730), of the Chaplin baronets
John Worthy Chaplin (1840–1920), English recipient of the Victoria Cross

See also[edit]

Chaplin (surname)

This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

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KWrite

KWrite

Developer(s)
KDE (Christoph Cullmann, Anders Lund, Joseph Wenninger, Hamish Rodda, et al.)

Stable release
16.12.1 (12 January 2017; 24 days ago (2017-01-12)) [±][1]

Development status
Active

Written in
C++

Operating system
Cross-Platform

Type
Text editor

License
LGPL

Website
kate-editor.org

A screenshot illustrating block selection mode

KWrite is a lightweight text editor by KDE, which, after K Desktop Environment 2, is based on the KATE text editor, and the KDE KParts technology, which allows it to use many of KATE’s features.

Contents

1 Features
2 See also
3 References
4 External links

Features[edit]

Export to HTML, PDF, or PostScript formats
Block selection mode (see screenshot)
Code folding
Bookmarks
Syntax highlighting
Encoding selection
End-of-line mode selection (Unix, Windows, Macintosh)
Word completion
Supports Plugins
Supports Vi input mode

See also[edit]

Free software portal

Comparison of text editors
Kate

References[edit]

^ “KDE Ships KDE Applications 16.12.1”. KDE. 12 January 2017. 

External links[edit]

Homepage of KWrite
KWrite user wiki
Handbook

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KDE

Software
Compilation

KDE 1
KDE 2
KDE 3
KDE SC 4
Post-fourth series

KDE Frameworks 5
KDE Plasma 5
KDE Applications

KDE Core
Applications

Development

Cervisia
KDbg
KDESvn
KDevelop
KImageMapEditor
Kompare
Lokalize
Quanta Plus
Umbrello

Education

Language

Artikulate
Kanagram
KHangMan
Kiten
KLettres
KWordQuiz

Mathematics

Cantor
KAlgebra
KBruch
Kig
KmPlot
LabPlot
Rocs

Misc

GCompris
KGeography
KTouch
KTurtle

Science

Kalzium
KBibTeX
kst
KStars
Marble
RKWard
Step

Games

KAtomic
KBounce
Kolf
KMines

Graphics

digiKam
Gwenview
Karbon
KColorEdit
KolourPaint
KPhotoAlbum
Krita
Spectacle
Skanlite

Internet

Akregator
KGet
KMail
KMLDonkey
KNode
Konqueror
Konversation
Kopete
Kppp
KRDC
KTorrent
Rekonq

Multimedia

Amarok
Dragon Player
JuK
K3b
K9Copy
Kaffeine
Kdenlive

Office

Okular
Calligra Suite

Words
Sheets
Stage
Flow
Karbon
Krita
Kexi
Plan

KAddressBook
Kile
KMyMoney
Kontact
KOrganizer
KPilot
Tellico
Trojitá

System

Dolphin
KDE Partition Manager
KDE System Guard
KInfoCenter
Konsole
Yakuake

Utilities

Ark
Filelight
KAlarm
Kate
KCalc
KCharSelect
KGPG
Klipper
KJots
Krusader
KRename
KWallet
KWrite

Platform

User interface

Current

KWin
KDE Plasma 5
Oxygen Pr

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