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Ndungu

Ndungu, or Ndung’u, is a surname of Kenyan origin that may refer to:

Njoki Susanna Ndung’u (born 1965), Kenyan lawyer and associate justice of the Supreme Court of Kenya
Njuguna Ndung’u (born 1960), Kenyan economist and Governor of the Central Bank of Kenya
Samuel Ndungu (born 1988), Kenyan long-distance runner based in Japan
Thumbi Ndung’u, Kenyan medic and AIDS researcher

See also[edit]

Ndungu Land Commission, public investigation into land use in Kenya

This page or section lists people with the surname Ndungu. If an internal link intending to refer to a specific person led you to this page, you may wish to change that link by adding the person’s given name(s) to the link.

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Bartolomeo Beccari

Jacopo Bartolomeo Beccari

Born
(1682-07-25)25 July 1682
Bologna, Papal States

Died
18 January 1766(1766-01-18) (aged 83)
Bologna, Papal States

Nationality
Bolognese

Occupation
Chemist

Known for
Discovery of gluten in wheat flour

Jacopo Bartolomeo Beccari (25 July 1682 – 18 January 1766) was an Italian chemist, one of the leading scientists in Bologna in the first half of the eighteenth century. He is mainly known as the discoverer of the gluten in wheat flour.
Life[edit]
Jacopo Bartolomeo Beccari was born in Bologna on 25 July 1682. In 1737 he was the first to give courses in chemistry at an Italian university. He carried out important research on the phosphorescence of bodies, and studied the measurement of the intensity of the light emitted[1] (De rebus aliisque adamant in phosphorum numerum referendis, 1745). He also studied the action of light on silver salts (De vi, quam ipsa per se lux habet, non colores modo, sed etiam texturam rerum, salvis interdum coloribus, immutandi, 1757). From his comments on foraminifera he is considered as one of the pioneers of microbiology.
Working at the Academy of Sciences of Bologna Institute, Beccari looked for ways to make populations resistant to famine through a new type of emergency diet.[2]
Beccari died in Bologna on 18 January 1766.
References[edit]
Citations

^ Beccari, Bartolomeo (1744). De quamplurimis phosphoris nunc primum detectis commentarius. Bologna, Italy: Ex typographia Laelii a Vulpe. 
^ Storia Accademia delle Scienze dell’istituto.

Sources

“Storia Accademia delle Scienze dell’istituto di Bologna”. Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali. Retrieved 2013-01-15. 

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 34724361
LCCN: n2007184156
ISNI: 0000 0001 1385 349X
GND: 117579483
SUDOC: 176781390
BNF: cb148529948 (data)
ICCU: IT\ICCU\SBLV\042577

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Dante da Maiano

Dante da Maiano was a late thirteenth-century poet who composed mainly sonnets in Italian and Occitan. He was an older contemporary of Dante Alighieri and active in Florence.
He may have been a Provençal- or Auvergnat-speaker from Maillane (the birthplace of Frédéric Mistral), but more probably he was from the Tuscan village of Maiano near Fiesole. In 1882 Adolfo Borgognoni argued that he was an invention of Renaissance philology, but met with the opposition of F. Novati in 1883 and Giovanni Bertacchi in 1896. Bertacchi argued that Dante da Maiano was the same person as the Dante Magalante, son of ser Ugo da Maiano, who appears in a public record of 1301. At the time this Dante was living in the monastery of San Benedetto in Alpe and was requested in mundualdum by a relative of his, Lapa, widow of Vanni di Chello Davizzi, to be her tutor. That a Dante da Maiano existed during the lifetime of Dante Alighieri and that he was capable of “tutoring” was thus established, but the identification with the poet could not be made certain. Santorre Debenedetti finally disproved Borgognoni’s thesis in 1907.[1] He discovered two Occitan sonnets ascribed to Dante da Maiano in a fifteenth-century Italian manuscript conserved in the Biblioteca Laurentiana, Florence.[2]
Almost all Dante’s extant work is preserved in the Giuntina (or “Junte”), a Florentine chansonnier compiled in 1527 under the title Sonetti e canzoni di diversi avtori toscani in dieci libri raccolte by Filippo Giunti.[3] His total work is some forty-eight sonnets, five ballate, two canzoni, and a series of tenzoni with Dante Alighieri.[1] He was influenced by the troubadours (notably Bernart de Ventadorn), the Sicilian School and in particular Giacomo da Lentini, the Tuscan School of Guittone d’Arezzo, and the later dolce stil novo, though he belongs to none of these. Rosanna Betarrini calls his work a “pastiche” and Antonio Enzo Quaglio a silloge archeologica della produzione anteriore e contemporanea (“an archaeological collection of past and contemporary production”).[4]
Dante da Maiano wrote a sonnet in response to A ciascun’ alma presa e gentil core, the first sonnet in Dante Alighieri’s Vita nuova.[5] There was also a five-part exchange (probably preceding the Vita nuova) called the duol d’amore (“dolour of love”), in which Dante da Maiano wrote three pieces and Dante Alighieri responded to the first two.[6] In a final two-part communication, Dante Alighieri wrote Savere e cortesia, ingegno ed art

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Ulster Volunteers

Ulster Volunteer Force

UVF emblem, with the Red Hand of Ulster and the motto “For God and Ulster”

Active
13 January 1913 – 1 May 1919 (various units active since 1912)
25 June 1920 – early 1922

Ideology
Ulster loyalism
British unionism
Opposition to Home Rule

Leaders
Edward Carson
James Craig

Headquarters
Belfast

Area of operations
Ulster

Strength
Unknown, at least 100,000 in 1912

Part of
Military wing of the Ulster Unionist Council

Became
Absorbed into the Ulster Special Constabulary

Opponents
Irish nationalists (including Irish republicans)
British government

Ulster Volunteer Force in 1914

The Ulster Volunteers was a unionist militia founded in 1912 to block domestic self-government (or Home Rule) for Ireland, which was then part of the United Kingdom. The Ulster Volunteers were based in the northern province of Ulster. Many Ulster Protestants feared being governed by a Catholic-majority parliament in Dublin and losing their local supremacy and strong links with Britain. In 1913, the militias were organised into the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) and vowed to resist any attempts by the British Government to ‘impose’ Home Rule on Ulster. Later that year, Irish nationalists formed a rival militia, the Irish Volunteers, to safeguard Home Rule. In April 1914, the UVF smuggled 25,000 rifles into Ulster. The Home Rule Crisis was halted by the outbreak of World War I in August 1914. Many UVF members enlisted with the British Army’s 36th (Ulster) Division and went to fight on the Western Front.
After World War I, the British Government decided to set up two self-governing regions in Ireland: Northern Ireland (made up of six Ulster counties with Protestant/unionist majorities) and Southern Ireland. However, by 1920 the Irish War of Independence was raging and the Irish Republican Army (IRA), the army of the self-declared Irish Republic, was launching attacks on British forces in Ireland. As a response to these attacks, the UVF was revived. However, this revival was largely unsuccessful and the UVF was absorbed into the Ulster Special Constabulary (USC), the reserve police force of the Northern Ireland Government.
A unionist paramilitary group calling itself the Ulster Volunteer Force was formed in 1966. It claims to be a direct descendant of the older organisation and uses the same logo, but there are no organisational links between the two.[citation needed]

Contents

1 Before World War I
2 World War I
3 After World War I
4 See

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The Dreamer (1970 film)

The Dreamer

Directed by
Dan Wolman

Produced by
Ami Artzi
Christopher C. Dewey
Dennis Friedland

Written by
Dan Wolman

Starring
Tuvia Tavi

Music by
Gershon Kingsley

Cinematography
Paul Glickman

Edited by
Barry H. Prince

Release date

1970

Running time

85 minutes

Country
Israel

Language
Hebrew

The Dreamer (Hebrew: Ha-Timhoni‎‎) is a 1970 Israeli drama film directed by Dan Wolman. It was entered into the 1970 Cannes Film Festival.[1]
Cast[edit]

Tuvia Tavi – Eli
Liora Rivlin – Girl
Berta Litwina – Old Woman Rachel
Shlomo Bar-Shavit – Manager of Home
Dvora Kedar – Mother (as Devora Halter-Keidar)
Natan Cogan – Father
Yisrael Segal – Waiter
Nathan Wolfovich – Mushkin (as Nathan W. Volfovitz)
Bila Rabinovitz – Litvinna

References[edit]

^ “Festival de Cannes: The Dreamer”. festival-cannes.com. Retrieved 2009-04-11. 

External links[edit]

The Dreamer at the Internet Movie Database

This article related to Israeli film is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Moleson Creek

Moleson Creek

Moleson Creek

Location in Guyana

Coordinates: 5°30′N 57°15′W / 5.500°N 57.250°W / 5.500; -57.250Coordinates: 5°30′N 57°15′W / 5.500°N 57.250°W / 5.500; -57.250

Country
Guyana

Region
East Berbice-Corentyne

Moleson Creek is a community on the Corentyne River in the East Berbice-Corentyne region of Guyana, located at 5°30′0″N 57°15′0″W / 5.50000°N 57.25000°W / 5.50000; -57.25000. It is north of Orealla Mission, 10 km (6.2 mi) south of Corriverton, and approximately 90 km (56 mi) from New Amsterdam.
Since 1998, the CANAWAIMA ferry connects Moleson Creek with South Drain in Suriname.[1] This is the only legal connection between the two countries, but before the repavement of the road between South Drain and Nieuw Nickerie many travelers preferred to take a back-track route.[2]
References[edit]

^ Ministerie van Transport, Communicatie en Toerisme – De Canawaima Ferry Service Incorporated
^ Kaieteur News – Canawaima Ferry Service seeks to boost travel

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Settlements in Guyana

For the definition of city, town, etc see Settlements in Guyana.

Cities

Georgetown

Towns

Albion
Anna Regina
Bartica
Corriverton
Fort Wellington
Ituni
Lethem
Linden
Mabaruma
Mahaica
Mahaicony
New Amsterdam
Paradise
Rosignol
Skeldon
Vreed en Hoop

Villages

Adventure
Aishalton
Annai
Arimu Mine
Belfield
Beterverwagting
Better Hope
Biloku
Blairmont
Burma
Buxton
Campbelltown
Cane Grove
Charity
Clonbrook
Crabwood Creek
El Paso
Enmore
Enterprise
Esau and Jacob
Everton
Fort Washington
Good Hope
Governor Light
Hackney
Helena
Holmia
Hope
Hosororo
Hyde Park
Imbaimadai
Isherton
Issano
Isseneru
Jonestown
Kabakaburi
Kalkuni
Kamarang
Kamikusa
Kamwatta Hill
Kangaruma
Kartabo
Kartuni
Keweigek
Koriabo
Kumaka, Barima-Waini
Kumaka, East Berbice-Corentyne
Kuru Kururu
Kurupukari
Kurupung
Kwakwani
Kwebanna
Leonora
Long Creek
Lusignan
Mahdia
Maicobi
Makouria
Mara
Matthew’s Ridge
Meten-Meer-Zorg
Moleson Creek
Mora Point
Morawhanna
Moruca
New Found Out
Nonpareil
Orealla
Orinduik
Paramakatoi
Parika
Peters Mine
Pickersgill
Port Kaituma
Port Mourant
Potaro Landing
Princeville
Providence
Rockstone
Rose Hall
Santa Rosa
Saveretik
Saxacalli
Schoon Ord
Seweyo
Silver Hill
Spring Garden
St. Cuthbert’s Mission
St. Monica Karawab
Suddie
Surama
Takama
Three Friends
Timehri
Towakaima
Tumatumari Landing
Tumatumari
Tumereng
Uitvlugt
Unity Village
Victoria
Wakapau
Wandai
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Naranpanawa Karagastenna

Naranpanawa Karagastenna

Village

Country
 Sri Lanka

Province
Central Province

Time zone
Sri Lanka Standard Time (UTC+5:30)

Naranpanawa Karagastenna is a village in Sri Lanka. It is located within Central Province.
See also[edit]

List of towns in Central Province, Sri Lanka

External links[edit]

Department of Census and Statistics -Sri Lanka

Coordinates: 7°20′N 80°44′E / 7.333°N 80.733°E / 7.333; 80.733

This Central Province, Sri Lanka location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Evangelista Analco

Evangelista Analco

Municipality and town

Evangelista Analco

Location in Mexico

Coordinates: 17°24′N 96°32′W / 17.400°N 96.533°W / 17.400; -96.533Coordinates: 17°24′N 96°32′W / 17.400°N 96.533°W / 17.400; -96.533

Country
 Mexico

State
Oaxaca

Area

 • Total
33.17 km2 (12.81 sq mi)

Population (2005)

 • Total
412

Time zone
Central Standard Time (UTC-6)

 • Summer (DST)
Central Daylight Time (UTC-5)

Evangelista Analco is a town and municipality in Oaxaca in south-western Mexico. The municipality covers an area of 33.17 km². It is part of the Ixtlán District in the Sierra Norte de Oaxaca region.
As of 2005, the municipality had a total population of 412.[1]
References[edit]

^ “Evangelista Analco”. Enciclopedia de los Municipios de México. Instituto Nacional para el Federalismo y el Desarrollo Municipal. Retrieved June 12, 2009. 

This article about a location in the Mexican state of Oaxaca is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Municipalities of Ixtlán District, Oaxaca

Abejones
Capulalpam de Méndez
Evangelista Analco
Guelatao de Juárez
Ixtlán de Juárez
Natividad
Nuevo Zoquiapam
San Juan Atepec
San Juan Chicomezuchil
San Juan Quiotepec
San Miguel Aloápam
San Miguel Amatlán
San Miguel del Río
San Miguel Yotao
San Pablo Macuiltianguis
San Pedro Yaneri
San Pedro Yólox
Santa Ana Yareni
Santa Catarina Ixtepeji
Santa Catarina Lachatao
Santa María Jaltianguis
Santa María Yavesía
Santiago Comaltepec
Santiago Laxopa
Santiago Xiacuí
Teococuilco de Marcos Pérez

See also Municipalities of Oaxaca

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